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Getting started

One of the best ways to get involved in ecological restoration is by participating in a conservation project close to your home. Use the map to find if a group exists already. If it doesn't, you can start the process of setting up a community group to restore a site that could benefit from some tender, loving care.
Starting a new group can seem daunting, but by following these simple steps, and tapping into the wealth of guidance on offer, you'll find it's surprisingly easy to get started.

Before starting work, you must have a clear vision of what you want to achieve. It can be a 'picture' of an ideal future state- maybe many decades into the future- or a description of what you will have achieved in, say, five years time.

Before embarking on an ecological restoration project you need to find out who owns the land you want to restore and obtain their approval. 
 

Are you planning to restore a forest, a dune, a estuary, freshwater wetland, a stream or an area that encompasses a number of different habitat types?

 

Health and safety is an important part of any ecological restoration project. By following some basic guidelines and being aware of hazards, everyone can be kept safe. 

The links below provide advice on funding and a sample of national and regional funds which are available for community groups who are carrying out restoration on public, private and covenanted land.

People are the most important resource for restoration projects.

Whether to attract more volunteers or raise awareness of conservation, marketing and promotion is becoming an increasingly important part of our conservation work.